Archive

Posts Tagged ‘qi gong’

Choosing a Daily Qigong Exercise

July 19, 2011 1 comment

With the thousands of different styles of qigong that are available, it can get very confusing as to which exercise is best to do. I have learned several styles, but doing them all is impossible. So I have asked myself: “Why choose a daily qigong exercise?”

First, a daily exercise routine reinforces muscle memory you have developed. If you have learned the proper movement technique of a particular qigong practice set, then you help maintain the correct posture and alignments. This forms the basis of your ability to perform other exercises correctly and maintain an energy flow balance.

Second, you don’t have to think about what you are doing, you just do it. It keeps things simple. Doing without doing is a basic Taoist principle. You are the movements and the movements become you. You embody the movements.

Third, it keeps you on track with how your body is functioning. You can use the daily exercise to use a reference point to see how your body and mind are for each day. Maybe you will notice that there are some things that you do which influence your health in a more positive way, and vice versa. It helps keep your life in a healthy perspective

In the end, you have to remember, it’s not how many qigong styles or any other type of exercise that you know how to do that make you healthy, it is whether you do something daily and routinely check up with your body to see how you are doing. It is not a contest. It is more about how you attend to your own being.

What are my recommendations?  I have none for you specifically, but personally, I have a short yang style tai chi routine that I do daily.  I also do a repetitive commencement move, which works my spine and the microcosmic orbit.  What you choose depends on you, but I would suggest that something that takes no longer than 15 minutes would be best, because some days may be less convenient for exercise.  A short practice will make it more likely that you will complete it and check in with yourself.

The Three Essential Elements of Qigong Exercises

October 4, 2010 2 comments

  Dr. Guan-Yuan Jin, MD, L.Ac., shares the three essential elements of qigong exercises in this video.  These elements are regulation of the breath, body and mind.   Keep in mind each of these elements as you are doing your practice, however the extent to which you do each of these varies depending on the type of qigong you are doing.

In order to learn qigong, you can’t do everything at once.  So focusing on one of these three elements and getting it right is sometimes the best option.  Learning qigong can only be done in steps.  There are so many details to the exercises that it is difficult to get the big picture when you are in the learning process.  That is why sometimes you see people focusing on very small details in order to get it right.

Bruce Frantzis, a qigong master from the United States, who also a lineage holder, has what is called a 16-part nei gong learning system.  In his system, students learn various types of nei gong exercises that focus on different parts of this system that relate to different levels of being able to move the energy within the body.  Learning each of these 16 parts takes time and dedication.

Breathing is a very deep aspect of the regulation of the energy.  When one has stable breathing, one can achieve a stable mind, or a regulated mind.  With both of these two elements working together, the body can become stable.   Qigong and nei gong exercises are designed to yoke together each of these three elements to help improve your ability to sense, regulate and conserve your energy.  Achieving all of these elements improves one’s ability to heal and carry out life’s daily activities.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Qigong Meditation Music

August 20, 2010 Leave a comment
Clavier français
Image via Wikipedia

Everyone has different ways to meditate. In qigong, meditation music is not a topic that people discuss frequently.  For me, it is useful to have music. It helps me relax, concentrate and remain with inner awareness. The music is best if it doesn’t have any words.

Many different types of music work for me. There are classical pieces that are more meditative in nature, such as the piano pieces by Grieg. I found a qigong blog recently that mentions music in combination with qigong meditation. It doesn’t list Grieg, but there are other classical music pieces that are given which are suitable for meditation. Other music types are mentioned include more well-known pieces by Dr. Jeffrey Thompson and Enya. I think that the list is a valuable one to look at.  There are many other options as well, such as the many selections that are classified within the New Age category.

Maybe the music approach will not work for everyone, but I do recommend it for helping you relax your mind so you can better use your inner awareness during meditation and qigong exercises. Sometimes we need a little help to get us on the way and make qigong exercise practice a more enjoyable and effective experience.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Yoga and Qigong: Different Ways to Yoke the Mind and Body

August 10, 2010 Leave a comment

I did, at one time, sign up for a forum on yoga. I thought that there was enough similarity between qigong and yoga for me to benefit from interacting with members there. At the time, I had some experience in yoga and lots of experience in qigong. I made several comments, mostly based on my experience in qigong, and referred to qigong as Chinese Yoga. However, the administrator of the forum did not agree with my viewpoint and thought my comments distracting. In light of this, I though I would do some comparisons of the two ancient traditions and show some similarities and differences between the two.

The word “yoga” means to yoke or link the mind and body. Qigong means “energy work,” but in order to do so it forges a link between the mind and the body. Yoga stretches and breathing methods resemble the fire method approach seen in certain qigong schools. Breath, visualization and postures are used to open up the body and create a more flexible and higher functioning body.

There are also water method schools of qigong, where allowing things to change and letting go are fundamental approaches for opening up the body for better functioning. In this school, there is a rule of not going further than 70-80% of your body’s capacity into any stretch, movement or breathing modality.

As both of these approaches are meditation techniques, they can give the practitioner a more calm mind and body. However, the result of the fire approach in Yoga and Qigong may, in some cases, be reflected in more involvement and reinforcement of the ego of the practitioner due to the nature of the approach. The water method of Taoist qigong allows for disengagement of the ego and letting go, which makes it helpful for developing more self-compassion and self-knowledge.

Another benefit of qigong as compared to yoga is that its movement practices can be easier to do that the postures. Although you will find some qigong practitioners that use a lotus posture for meditation, many practitioners of qigong meditation use a sitting posture in a chair to help increase the energetic connection of the ground with the legs and hips. This meditation posture can be much easier for older adults who have limited flexibility.

I am not discouraging those who wish to and can do yoga, I have and do practice it from time to time to help correct imbalances that occur in my musculature. It is very useful for that purpose and can be a very useful tool for helping with your qigong practice. But know that the different philosophical approaches can differently affect the nature of mind as well as the body.

Force and Qigong Meditation Approaches

There are basically two schools of Taoist meditation, one that is called the “fire” school and another that is called the “water” school. The approaches in meditation differ considerably. The water school is derived from the original teachings of Lao Tze in the Tao Te Ching. Cultivation of the “valley spirit” figures heavily in the approach of this type of meditation. In contrast, there is the fire school, where one uses effort to make progress. You could say that force is a valid way of describing the fire method approach. It is an outer method of development.

The water method is a means of allowing things to change, but presenting yourself with a consistent practice that helps foster that change. It is an approach of letting go. During the process, because of the regular practice, an increase in compassion for yourself (it is inner development, by the way) and others. Forgiveness, acceptance, detachment and tranquility become more common in your life.

I was reading a review of a recent book by Pema Chodron by a Brigham University student the other day. The review was interesting from the perspective of the author. His perception was that Buddhist meditation was a means of beating a type of consciousness into your being so that you were transformed into a more enlightened being. There are fire forms of Buddhist meditation that require visualization and verbalization as a part of the meditation progress, but as I remember Pema Chodron’s work, compassion and the water method are the primary routes for meditation progress.

I can understand the viewpoint of the reviewer of the book, since I have had many years of indoctrination into the principles of the Protestant Christian Church. The moralistic approach of many of the churches within that tradition can be a hindrance to inner development, and consist of more of a pasting-on of a proper socially acceptable mask on the practitioners. The development may, and frequently does, take on the path of what is called “prosperity theology” or Christian materialism.

The Taoist method of water meditation takes on many forms. An introductory practice is following of the breath. This method is especially good for beginners because it helps cultivate intention (Yi) that can be used in more advanced practices. If you are new to this concept, see the blog entry

Medical Qigong Healing

Representation of the Chinese five elements (w...
Image via Wikipedia

I just added a lens on Squidoo on Qigong Healing Methods. The lens talks about Medical Qigong and the use of medical prescriptions of qigong exercises for helping people heal from various disorders. The article is a general overview of the topic which serves as an introduction to this important branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine. There are several schools of Medical Qigong in the United States where you can get training.

Dr. Jerry Allan Johnson opened up a school in 1985 in California and the organization is called the International Institute of Medical Qigong.   His students have also opened up various centers across the U.S.  Dr. Johnson has produced many training for Medical Qigong Doctors and specific practices or prescriptions that are suited for various disorders.  These videos reflect the text of his book:  Chinese Medical Qigong Therapy.  A Comprehensive Clinical Text.  For anyone who is looking into the benefits of alternative medicine and wants to become actively involved in their own healing, I encourage them to look into this option.

Enhanced by Zemanta

The Many Benefits That Come From Engaging in a Regular Qigong Healing Practice

June 21, 2010 6 comments

Qigong healing routines are extremely important for the maintenance of health in China and these meditative, or mindful, movements are becoming more popular within the United States. Medical professionals are more likely to advise integrating the use of these exercise methods with Western medical advice to help individuals recuperate from infirmities.

It has been documented that there are over 10,000 forms of qigong, including those exercises used in martial arts, however the vast majority of people do these relaxing qigong practices for benefiting health and increasing personal energy. You find many people doing these qigong health exercises early in the morning because the practice helps set a positive pace for an upcoming day’s work and it boosts your energy levels to help you through your day.

There are many personal stories about the success of qigong practice, especially in regards as to its benefits for health and ability to help overcome many disorders. A good many of the reports have come from China, where people have suffered and recovered from weak vision, back pains, general malaise, various types of cancer, and several other maladies after commencing a daily exercise routine of qigong. There are many videos of practitioners from different countries who report that these exercises have helped them overcome high blood pressure, diabetes, coronary conditions, and pulmonary disorders. Scientific studies have also exhibited that qigong healing routines also can help improve peoples’ resistance to disease.

Since Qigong routines emphasize the use of gentleness in the movements as well as in the breath practices, they can be easily changed for use with those who have a variety of conditions, including people who are bed-ridden or are unable to walk. The qigong breathing meditations, which can be done by anyone, are the first step in the rehabilitation of breathing ability, and they benefit the circulatory systems for lymph and blood flow. Improved circulatory system function assists in toxin removal out of the body.

If you have a health disorder or just are experiencing a indefinable energy deficit, you should certainly explore the feasibility of carrying out a easy qigong routine to assist you to get better. Practice routines which take no more than fifteen min. out of your morning can result in enormous benefits for your health. Practice daily for a couple of weeks to figure out the benefits for yourself. Find a teacher to help familiarize yourself with a simple practice. Many have tried it and have reaped the benefits and now live more healthy, energetic lives!